Board of directors

A board of directors (B of D) is a group of individuals, elected to represent shareholders. A board’s mandate is to establish policies for corporate management and oversight, making decisions on .

Board structure can differ slightly in international settings. Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something along the way.

A board of directors (B of D) is a group of individuals, elected to represent shareholders. A board’s mandate is to establish policies for corporate management and oversight, making decisions on .
board of directors n. the policy managers of a corporation or organization elected by the shareholders or members. The Board in turn chooses the officers of the corporation, sets basic policy, and is responsible to the shareholders.
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws.
A board of directors is a recognized group of people who jointly oversee the activities of an organization, which can be either a for-profit business, nonprofit organization, or a government agency. Such a board's powers, duties, and responsibilities are determined by government regulations (including the jurisdiction's corporations law) and the organization's own constitution and bylaws.
board of directors n. the policy managers of a corporation or organization elected by the shareholders or members. The Board in turn chooses the officers of the corporation, sets basic policy, and is responsible to the shareholders.
Additional Definitions

Navigation menu

board of directors n. the policy managers of a corporation or organization elected by the shareholders or members. The Board in turn chooses the officers of the corporation, sets basic policy, and is responsible to the shareholders.

With respect to diligence, what was required was:. More recently, it has been suggested that both the tests of skill and diligence should be assessed objectively and subjectively; in the United Kingdom, the statutory provisions relating to directors' duties in the new Companies Act have been codified on this basis.

In most jurisdictions, the law provides for a variety of remedies in the event of a breach by the directors of their duties:. Historically, directors' duties have been owed almost exclusively to the company and its members, and the board was expected to exercise its powers for the financial benefit of the company. However, more recently there have been attempts to "soften" the position, and provide for more scope for directors to act as good corporate citizens.

For example, in the United Kingdom, the Companies Act requires directors of companies "to promote the success of the company for the benefit of its members as a whole" and sets out the following six factors regarding a director's duty to promote success:.

This represents a considerable departure from the traditional notion that directors' duties are owed only to the company. Previously in the United Kingdom, under the Companies Act , protections for non-member stakeholders were considerably more limited see for example, s.

The changes have therefore been the subject of some criticism. Most companies have weak mechanisms for bringing the voice of society into the board room. They rely on personalities who weren't appointed for their understanding of societal issues. Often they give limited focus both through time and financial resource to issues of corporate responsibility and sustainability.

A Social Board has society designed into its structure. It elevates the voice of society through specialist appointments to the board and mechanisms that empower innovation from within the organisation. Social Boards align themselves with themes that are important to society. These may include measuring worker pay ratios, linking personal social and environmental objectives to remuneration, integrated reporting, fair tax and B-Corp Certification.

Social Boards recognise that they are part of society and that they require more than a licence to operate to succeed. They balance short-term shareholder pressure against long-term value creation, managing the business for a plurality of stakeholders including employees, shareholders, supply chains and civil society. The Sarbanes—Oxley Act of has introduced new standards of accountability on boards of U.

Under the Act, directors risk large fines and prison sentences in the case of accounting crimes. Internal control is now the direct responsibility of directors. The vast majority of companies covered by the Act have hired internal auditors to ensure that the company adheres to required standards of internal control. The internal auditors are required by law to report directly to an audit board, consisting of directors more than half of whom are outside directors, one of whom is a "financial expert.

The law requires companies listed on the major stock exchanges NYSE, NASDAQ to have a majority of independent directors—directors who are not otherwise employed by the firm or in a business relationship with it.

According to the Corporate Library's study, the average size of publicly traded company's board is 9. According to Investopedia, some analysts think the ideal size is seven.

While a board may have several committees, two—the compensation committee and audit committee—are critical and must be made up of at least three independent directors and no inside directors. Other common committees in boards are nominating and governance.

Directorship is a part-time job. A recent National Association of Corporate Directors study found directors averaging just 4.

According to John Gillespie, a former investment banker and co-author of a book critical of boards, [62] "Far too much of their time has been for check-the-box and cover-your-behind activities rather than real monitoring of executives and providing strategic advice on behalf of shareholders". The issue of gender representation on corporate boards of directors has been the subject of much criticism in recent years.

Governments and corporations have responded with measures such as legislation mandating gender quotas and comply or explain systems to address the disproportionality of gender representation on corporate boards. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For other uses, see Board Room disambiguation and Board of Trustees disambiguation. Management accounting Financial accounting Financial audit.

Cooperative Corporation Limited liability company Partnership Sole proprietorship State-owned enterprise. Annual general meeting Board of directors Supervisory board Advisory board Audit committee. Commercial law Constitutional documents Contract Corporate crime Corporate liability Insolvency law International trade law Mergers and acquisitions.

Commodity Public economics Labour economics Development economics International economics Mixed economy Planned economy Econometrics Environmental economics Open economy Market economy Knowledge economy Microeconomics Macroeconomics Economic development Economic statistics.

Marketing Marketing research Public relations Sales. Business analysis Business ethics Business plan Business judgment rule Consumer behaviour Business operations International business Business model International trade Business process Business statistics.

The examples and perspective in this section deal primarily with the United States and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. You may improve this article , discuss the issue on the talk page , or create a new article , as appropriate. May Learn how and when to remove this template message. The examples and perspective in this section deal primarily with the United Kingdom and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject.

April Learn how and when to remove this template message. Directors' duties and Fiduciary duties. Alternate director Celebrity board director Chairman Chief executive officer Corporate governance Corporate title Gender representation on corporate boards of directors Interlocking directorate Governing boards of colleges and universities in the United States Managing director Non-executive director Parliamentary procedure in the corporate world President corporate title Supervisory board in German: A private company cannot use a written resolution under section A — a meeting must be held.

Company A owned a cinema, and the directors decided to acquire two other cinemas with a view to selling the entire undertaking as a going concern. They formed a new company "Company B" to take the leases of the two new cinemas. Later, instead of selling the undertaking, they sold all of the shares in both companies and made a substantial profit. The shareholders of Company A sued asking that directors and their friends to disgorge the profits that they had made in connection with their 3, shares in Company B — the very same shares which the shareholders in Company A had been asked to subscribe through Company A but refused to do so.

Institute on Governance Canada. Archived from the original on 30 December Retrieved 24 May The Robert's Rules Association. Archived from the original on 15 July Retrieved 24 December The Formative Years of the Modern Corporation: Retrieved 13 March CEO involvement in the selection of new board members: Corporate governance and firm value: The impact of the governance rules Archived 11 June at the Wayback Machine.. The Journal of Finance. A Survey of Recent Evidence". Journal of Applied Finance.

Corporate Governance by State". Nonprofit Governance by State". To Pay or Not to Pay? Retrieved 2 May Author, Charities should generally not compensate persons for service on the board of directors except to reimburse direct expenses of such service. In finance, directorate is sometimes used in place of "board An independent outside director is a member of a company's board An outside director is a member of a company's board of directors Fund boards oversee management and operations of the fund on behalf of shareholders.

Make sure you've got a board that will look out for you. Are your shoulder's wide enough to carry a company's reputation? A group of influential pension funds urged the electric car maker to appoint two new directors, claiming that the current boardroom lacks independence.

Find out what it takes to become managing director at a major investment bank, starting from business school and surviving all of the titles in between. BWLD plans to nominate two experienced industry executives to its board at its upcoming annual shareholder's meeting.

With current members James M. At an upcoming shareholder meeting, CEO Zuckerberg will face calls to give up his dual roles. A majority of board members said the June meeting was not an appropriate time to adjust current interest rates. Private boards may be quite active in some companies and may exercise supervisory powers; in others board members are chiefly used as resources and as ambassadors to other interests; in yet others boards are a mere formality required by law.

Corporate boards have members, usually called "directors," who are elected by the stockholders. In the ordinary course of events, a privately held corporation has board members selected by the consensus of the company's founders without a formal election. When the company goes public and stockholder numbers increase substantially, the company prepares slates of board candidates and submits these to stockholders for a vote. The stockholder may accept the recommended slate, choose one of the alternatives, name others who do not appear on the list, or give his or her vote "proxy" to the company itself to exercise.

Board members are called inside directors if they are members of the management or outside directors if they have no direct role in the company itself. Outside directors are typically well-known figures in the business community recruited for service on the board to provide valuable advice and counsel; they may not be executives of competitors or sit on competitors' boards.

Outside directors may also be drawn from community organizations sometimes representing academia, law, labor, or other large constituencies or interests. Outside directors are also called independent directors because they are not under the influence of the chief executive of the corporation.

In publicly held companies directors receive compensation for their services. Compensation may also be paid in privately held organizations.

Under the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission SEC , directors of either category are held to be "insiders" and therefore prohibited from trading stock based on "inside knowledge. In large corporations the board is frequently subdivided into committees with functional roles such as Executive, Finance, Compensation, Strategy, Audit, etc. Board members are assigned to committees and these, in turn, develop positions on issues pertinent to the functional matter assigned to the committee.

They make recommendations to the full board. Under legislation passed in , audit committees are mandatory and their functions and membership are precisely defined. Boards set their own rules of operation. If the corporation's bylaws or charter specify that Robert's Rules of Order will be followed, procedures may take the parliamentary form—or do so if conflicts arise. In large corporations the board—and its committees—will have full-time staffs engaged in preparatory and administrative work related to board activities.

Employees of such staffs are also considered to be insiders because of their unique access to sensitive data. In a small privately held corporation the board will typically be a so-called "working board," with its members all engaged in the business.

In addition one or two additional family members may be on the board but inactive in operations. Board meetings tend to be rather informal in such situations because operational and board decisions coincide. The paper-work connected with the board activity—recording legally mandated board meetings, for instance—will be seen as rather a nuisance. If and when the business begins to grow, the board will tend to evolve.

A growing business tends to enlarge its board by inviting new investors to serve—or may have to welcome a new investor or his or her representative willingly or not. The owners also often see great benefit in drawing in people who can bring new points of view and important skills and knowledge in guiding the company as it expands, often into unfamiliar territories. An "advisory board" thus develops.

Popular 'Entrepreneurship, Management, & Small Business' Terms

A board of directors is a team of people elected by a corporation's shareholders to represent the shareholders' interests and ensure that the company's management acts on their behalf. The head of the board of directors is the chairman or chairperson of the board. A board of directors (B of D) is a group of individuals, elected to represent shareholders. A board’s mandate is to establish policies for corporate management and oversight, making decisions on . Members of the board usually include senior-most executives (called 'inside directors' or 'executive directors') as well as experts or respected persons chosen from the wider community (called 'outside directors' or 'non-executive directors').